Reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health

Reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health

The vision of WHO in the Western Pacific Region and globally is:

  • a healthy start for every newborn
  • an end to preventable deaths for women and children
  • that all births are wanted
  • children, adolescents and women of reproductive age have access to quality care when needed, are supported to make evidence-informed decisions, and are protected from misleading information, coercion, violence and injury.

Our mission is to strengthen the health system and to cultivate an enabling environment where skilled health professionals provide quality reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health services, accessible to all.

New publications

  • Maternal Health Care: Policies, Technical Standards and Service Accessibility in Eight Countries in the Western Pacific Region
    In its mandate to provide normative guidance to Member States, WHO has issued various evidence-based guidelines and recommendations on maternal health care. This report shows the dissemination and implementation status of these guidelines and recommendations in eight Member States that account for 96% of maternal deaths and 97% of neonatal deaths in the Region. The findings of this report suggest that national guidelines and protocols often do not include the recent WHO recommendations. Where the degree of congruity with WHO guidelines is high, the protocols are often not fully applied in practice.
  • Cambodia: identifying actions for scaling up long-acting reversible contraceptives
    Among the Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region, Cambodia has one of the lowest modern methods contraceptive prevalence rates (CPRs) at 38.8% among married women. Thirty per cent of married women not desiring pregnancy either do not use a family planning method or use a traditional method, placing them at increased risk of pregnancy. This study aims to understand: 1) What strategic actions can be built upon the current family planning programme to accelerate the reduction of undesired pregnancies? 2) What is the feasibility of scaling up long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), including implants, nationwide to help reduce undesired pregnancies?
  • Papua New Guinea : actions for scaling up long-acting reversible contraception
    Among the Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region, Papua New Guinea has one of the lowest contraceptive prevalence rates at 32.4%, among married women. Addressing the unmet need for family planning is critical to reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Fewer unwanted pregnancies reduce maternal and child mortality, morbidity and malnutrition, and also improve employment opportunities for women, educational attainment and economic gains. This study aims to address: 1) What strategic actions can build upon the current family planning programme to accelerate the reduction of undesired pregnancies? 2) Is scaling up long-acting reversible contraception, including implants, feasible nationwide?

Maternal health

67%fewer maternal deaths would occur if modern methods of contraception were used optimally.

Maternal health fact sheet

Unwanted Pregnancies and the Need to Increase Access to Modern Contraceptives

Newborn health

Every 2 minutesa newborn dies in the Western Pacific Region. With First Embrace, they do not have to die.

WHO-WPRO First Embrace

Child health

1/3of all child deaths have undernutrition as a contributing factor.

Child health fact sheet

Adolescent health

16 000 000girls aged 15 to 19 give birth every year (est.)

Adolescent health fact sheet

Featured publications and advocacy materials

What is the best way to protect from unintended pregnancy?

Introducing and sustaining EENC in hospitals: routine childbirth and newborn care

Featured video

First Embrace: The universal first act of love

Contact

Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health
Division of NCD and Health through the Life-Course
World Health Organization
Regional Office for the Western Pacific
P.O. Box 2932
1000 Manila
wpromca@who.int