Expanded programme on immunization

Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis

Tetanus vaccination
Mother brings her baby to a scheduled vaccination session at a local clinic in Siem Reap

Diphtheria toxoid combined with tetanus and pertussis vaccines (DTP) has been part of the WHO Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) since its inception in 1974.

DTP3 coverage is often used as a proxy indicator to measure the performance for the immunization system.

Diphtheria

Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP) vaccination
Immunization day in the Selima community

Diphtheria vaccinations are given in routine immunization services in the Western Pacific Region. The disease is caused by the bacterium corynebacterium diphtheriae. This bacterium produces a toxin that can harm or destroy human body tissues and organs. Another type, more common in the Tropics, causes ulcers on the skin.

Tetanus

Pertusis vaccination
WHO/Yoshi Shimizu

Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is a serious but preventable disease that affects the body's muscles and nerves. It typically arises from a skin wound that becomes contaminated by a bacterium called clostridium tetani, which is often found in soil

Pertussis

DTP vaccinationa
Vaccines work!

Pertussis (commonly known as whooping cough) is a highly contagious bacterial disease of the respiratory tract. It occurs mainly in infants and young children, and is easily transmitted from person to person, mainly through droplets. The first symptoms generally appear 7-10 days after infection, and include mild fever, runny nose, and cough, which in typical cases gradually develops into a paroxysmal cough followed by a whooping noise. Pertussis can be prevented by immunization.

DTP

fact buffet

Diphtheria fact

97 % coverage with three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine in 2016

Data source: JRF database 2016 WPR

Tetanus fact

1 country remaining in the region to achieve maternal and neonatal tetanus elimination

Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination (MNTE) HQ

Pertussis fact

27 500 cases of pertussis were reported in Western Pacific Region in 2016

Data source: JRF database 2016 WPR