The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) Reviews


The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) review is a systematic and comprehensive review of a country’s health system. It assesses the health system’s core components —organization and governance, financing, physical and human resources, service provision, and health reforms.

HiTs are produced by a team of country experts in collaboration with an external editor under the guidance of the APO Secretariat. Each HiT highlights challenges and areas requiring in-depth analysis and provides a tool for the dissemination of information on health systems. The APO HiT reviews cover the countries of the WHO Western Pacific and South East Asia regions.

HiTs use a standardized template, which is aligned with the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies HiT Template .

HiTs are re-written every three to five years.


Living HiTs

The current health sector development in the Asia Pacific region is a dynamic and rapidly evolving process. The APO recognizes that the HiT reviews possess a “shelf-life” of approximately 5 years, requiring a completely new review thereafter. In-between the complete renewals of a HiT, the APO has put in place a mechanism to update sections of the published HiTs to capture significant changes in the interim. These are called the “Living HiTs” series and are produced as necessary, enabling comparisons across time, to ensure continued relevance of the HIT to the member countries of the region.

Living HiTs

Health Systems in Transition Policy Notes

The Health Systems in Transition Policy Notes provide clear and concise information on selected policy issues confronting a country’s progress towards achieving its health sector goals. The Policy Notes series are used to inform evidence-based health policy advocacy and discussions in the country as a follow-up to the release of the HiT. The Policy Notes address 3 key topics: (i) What is the problem? (ii) What is the evidence / What do we know? (iii) What are the options and recommendation? Although evidence will be primarily drawn from the country’s HiT, updated data and administrative or regulatory changes may also be included where appropriate.

Policy Notes